Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT) Mexico

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Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT) Mexico

Authors

Publications

Evolution of host plant use and diversification in a species complex of parasitic weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

Hernandez-Vera, Gerardo; Toševski, Ivo; Caldara, Roberto; Emerson, Brent C.

(PeerJ Inc., 2019)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Hernandez-Vera, Gerardo
AU  - Toševski, Ivo
AU  - Caldara, Roberto
AU  - Emerson, Brent C.
PY  - 2019
UR  - https://plantarum.izbis.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/564
AB  - Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea) represent one of the most diverse groups of organisms on Earth; interactions with their host plants have been recognized to play a central role in their remarkable diversity, yet the exact mechanisms and factors still remain poorly understood. Using phylogenetic comparative analyses, here we investigate the evolution of host use and its possible role in diversification processes of Rhinusa and Gymnetron, two closely related groups of weevils that feed and develop inside plant tissues of hosts within the families Scrophulariaceae and Plantaginaceae. We found strong evidence for phylogenetic conservatism of host use at the plant family level, most likely due to substantial differences in the chemical composition of hosts, reducing the probability of shifts between host families. In contrast, the use of different plant organs represents a more labile ecological trait and ecological niche expansion that allows a finer partitioning of resources. Rhinusa and Gymnetron weevils initially specialized on plants within Scrophulariaceae and then shifted to the closely related Plantaginaceae; likewise, a gall inducing behavior evolved from non-galler weevils, possibly in response to resource competition, as galls facilitate larval development by providing enhanced nutrition and a favorable microhabitat. Results from trait-dependent diversification analyses suggest that both use of hosts within Plantaginaceae and parasitism on fruits and seed capsules are associated with enhanced diversification of Rhinusa and Gymnetron via low extinction rates. Our study provides quantitative evidence and insights on the ecological factors that can promote diversification in phytophagous insects that feed and develop inside plant tissues.
PB  - PeerJ Inc.
T2  - PEERJ
T1  - Evolution of host plant use and diversification in a species complex of parasitic weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)
VL  - 7
DO  - 10.7717/peerj.6625
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Hernandez-Vera, Gerardo and Toševski, Ivo and Caldara, Roberto and Emerson, Brent C.",
year = "2019",
abstract = "Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea) represent one of the most diverse groups of organisms on Earth; interactions with their host plants have been recognized to play a central role in their remarkable diversity, yet the exact mechanisms and factors still remain poorly understood. Using phylogenetic comparative analyses, here we investigate the evolution of host use and its possible role in diversification processes of Rhinusa and Gymnetron, two closely related groups of weevils that feed and develop inside plant tissues of hosts within the families Scrophulariaceae and Plantaginaceae. We found strong evidence for phylogenetic conservatism of host use at the plant family level, most likely due to substantial differences in the chemical composition of hosts, reducing the probability of shifts between host families. In contrast, the use of different plant organs represents a more labile ecological trait and ecological niche expansion that allows a finer partitioning of resources. Rhinusa and Gymnetron weevils initially specialized on plants within Scrophulariaceae and then shifted to the closely related Plantaginaceae; likewise, a gall inducing behavior evolved from non-galler weevils, possibly in response to resource competition, as galls facilitate larval development by providing enhanced nutrition and a favorable microhabitat. Results from trait-dependent diversification analyses suggest that both use of hosts within Plantaginaceae and parasitism on fruits and seed capsules are associated with enhanced diversification of Rhinusa and Gymnetron via low extinction rates. Our study provides quantitative evidence and insights on the ecological factors that can promote diversification in phytophagous insects that feed and develop inside plant tissues.",
publisher = "PeerJ Inc.",
journal = "PEERJ",
title = "Evolution of host plant use and diversification in a species complex of parasitic weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)",
volume = "7",
doi = "10.7717/peerj.6625"
}
Hernandez-Vera, G., Toševski, I., Caldara, R.,& Emerson, B. C.. (2019). Evolution of host plant use and diversification in a species complex of parasitic weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). in PEERJ
PeerJ Inc.., 7.
https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.6625
Hernandez-Vera G, Toševski I, Caldara R, Emerson BC. Evolution of host plant use and diversification in a species complex of parasitic weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). in PEERJ. 2019;7.
doi:10.7717/peerj.6625 .
Hernandez-Vera, Gerardo, Toševski, Ivo, Caldara, Roberto, Emerson, Brent C., "Evolution of host plant use and diversification in a species complex of parasitic weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)" in PEERJ, 7 (2019),
https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.6625 . .
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Morphological, molecular and biological evidence reveal two cryptic species in Mecinus janthinus Germar (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), a successful biological control agent of Dalmatian toadflax, Linaria dalmatica (Lamiales, Plantaginaceae)

Toševski, Ivo; Caldara, Roberto; Jović, Jelena; Hernandez-Vera, Gerardo; Baviera, Cosimo; Gassmann, Andre; Emerson, Brent C.

(Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, 2011)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Toševski, Ivo
AU  - Caldara, Roberto
AU  - Jović, Jelena
AU  - Hernandez-Vera, Gerardo
AU  - Baviera, Cosimo
AU  - Gassmann, Andre
AU  - Emerson, Brent C.
PY  - 2011
UR  - https://plantarum.izbis.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/152
AB  - A combined morphological, molecular and biological study shows that the weevil species presently named Mecinus janthinus is actually composed of two different cryptic species: M. janthinus Germar, 1821 and M. janthiniformis Tosevski & Caldara sp.n. These species are morphologically distinguishable from each other by a few very subtle morphological characters. On the contrary, they are more readily distinguishable by both molecular and biological characters. A molecular assessment based on the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene revealed fixed differences between the two species with p-distances between samples of both species ranging from 1.3 to 2.4%. In addition to this, the larvae of the two species are found to develop on different species within the genus Linaria (Plantaginaceae): M. janthinus is associated with yellow toadflax (L. vulgaris) and M. janthiniformis with broomleaf toadflax (L. genistifolia) and Dalmatian toadflax (L. dalmatica). Molecular and host use records further suggest the occurrence of a third species associated with L. vulgaris within M. janthinus, sampled from north Switzerland, central Hungary and east Serbia. The significance of these new findings is of particular importance because species of the M. janthinus group are used, or are potential candidates, for the biological control of invasive toadflaxes in North America.
PB  - Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken
T2  - Systematic Entomology
T1  - Morphological, molecular and biological evidence reveal two cryptic species in Mecinus janthinus Germar (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), a successful biological control agent of Dalmatian toadflax, Linaria dalmatica (Lamiales, Plantaginaceae)
EP  - 753
IS  - 4
SP  - 741
VL  - 36
DO  - 10.1111/j.1365-3113.2011.00593.x
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Toševski, Ivo and Caldara, Roberto and Jović, Jelena and Hernandez-Vera, Gerardo and Baviera, Cosimo and Gassmann, Andre and Emerson, Brent C.",
year = "2011",
abstract = "A combined morphological, molecular and biological study shows that the weevil species presently named Mecinus janthinus is actually composed of two different cryptic species: M. janthinus Germar, 1821 and M. janthiniformis Tosevski & Caldara sp.n. These species are morphologically distinguishable from each other by a few very subtle morphological characters. On the contrary, they are more readily distinguishable by both molecular and biological characters. A molecular assessment based on the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene revealed fixed differences between the two species with p-distances between samples of both species ranging from 1.3 to 2.4%. In addition to this, the larvae of the two species are found to develop on different species within the genus Linaria (Plantaginaceae): M. janthinus is associated with yellow toadflax (L. vulgaris) and M. janthiniformis with broomleaf toadflax (L. genistifolia) and Dalmatian toadflax (L. dalmatica). Molecular and host use records further suggest the occurrence of a third species associated with L. vulgaris within M. janthinus, sampled from north Switzerland, central Hungary and east Serbia. The significance of these new findings is of particular importance because species of the M. janthinus group are used, or are potential candidates, for the biological control of invasive toadflaxes in North America.",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken",
journal = "Systematic Entomology",
title = "Morphological, molecular and biological evidence reveal two cryptic species in Mecinus janthinus Germar (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), a successful biological control agent of Dalmatian toadflax, Linaria dalmatica (Lamiales, Plantaginaceae)",
pages = "753-741",
number = "4",
volume = "36",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-3113.2011.00593.x"
}
Toševski, I., Caldara, R., Jović, J., Hernandez-Vera, G., Baviera, C., Gassmann, A.,& Emerson, B. C.. (2011). Morphological, molecular and biological evidence reveal two cryptic species in Mecinus janthinus Germar (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), a successful biological control agent of Dalmatian toadflax, Linaria dalmatica (Lamiales, Plantaginaceae). in Systematic Entomology
Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken., 36(4), 741-753.
https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3113.2011.00593.x
Toševski I, Caldara R, Jović J, Hernandez-Vera G, Baviera C, Gassmann A, Emerson BC. Morphological, molecular and biological evidence reveal two cryptic species in Mecinus janthinus Germar (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), a successful biological control agent of Dalmatian toadflax, Linaria dalmatica (Lamiales, Plantaginaceae). in Systematic Entomology. 2011;36(4):741-753.
doi:10.1111/j.1365-3113.2011.00593.x .
Toševski, Ivo, Caldara, Roberto, Jović, Jelena, Hernandez-Vera, Gerardo, Baviera, Cosimo, Gassmann, Andre, Emerson, Brent C., "Morphological, molecular and biological evidence reveal two cryptic species in Mecinus janthinus Germar (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), a successful biological control agent of Dalmatian toadflax, Linaria dalmatica (Lamiales, Plantaginaceae)" in Systematic Entomology, 36, no. 4 (2011):741-753,
https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3113.2011.00593.x . .
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Host-associated genetic differentiation in a seed parasitic weevil Rhinusa antirrhini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data

Hernandez-Vera, Gerardo; Mitrović, Milana; Jović, Jelena; Toševski, Ivo; Caldara, Roberto; Gassmann, Andre; Emerson, Brent C.

(Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, 2010)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Hernandez-Vera, Gerardo
AU  - Mitrović, Milana
AU  - Jović, Jelena
AU  - Toševski, Ivo
AU  - Caldara, Roberto
AU  - Gassmann, Andre
AU  - Emerson, Brent C.
PY  - 2010
UR  - https://plantarum.izbis.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/136
AB  - Plant feeding insects and the plants they feed upon represent an ecological association that is thought to be a key factor for the diversification of many plant feeding insects, through differential adaptation to different plant selective pressures. While a number of studies have investigated diversification of plant feeding insects above the species level, relatively less attention has been given to patterns of diversification within species, particularly those that also require plants for oviposition and subsequent larval development. In the case of plant feeding insects that also require plant tissues for the completion of their reproductive cycle through larval development, the divergent selective pressure not only acts on adults, but on the full life history of the insect. Here we focus attention on Rhinusa antirrhini (Curculionidae), a species of weevil broadly distributed across Europe that both feeds on, and oviposits and develops within, species of the plant genus Linaria (Plantaginaceae). Using a combination of mtDNA (COII) and nuclear DNA (EF1-alpha) sequencing and copulation experiments we assess evidence for host associated genetic differentiation within R. antirrhini. We find substantial genetic variation within this species that is best explained by ecological specialisation on different host plant taxa. This genetic differentiation is most pronounced in the mtDNA marker, with patterns of genetic variation at the nuclear marker suggesting incomplete lineage sorting and/or gene flow between different host plant forms of R. antirrhini, whose origin is estimated to date to the mid-Pliocene (3.77 Mya; 2.91-4.80 Mya).
PB  - Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken
T2  - Molecular Ecology
T1  - Host-associated genetic differentiation in a seed parasitic weevil Rhinusa antirrhini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data
EP  - 2300
IS  - 11
SP  - 2286
VL  - 19
DO  - 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04639.x
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Hernandez-Vera, Gerardo and Mitrović, Milana and Jović, Jelena and Toševski, Ivo and Caldara, Roberto and Gassmann, Andre and Emerson, Brent C.",
year = "2010",
abstract = "Plant feeding insects and the plants they feed upon represent an ecological association that is thought to be a key factor for the diversification of many plant feeding insects, through differential adaptation to different plant selective pressures. While a number of studies have investigated diversification of plant feeding insects above the species level, relatively less attention has been given to patterns of diversification within species, particularly those that also require plants for oviposition and subsequent larval development. In the case of plant feeding insects that also require plant tissues for the completion of their reproductive cycle through larval development, the divergent selective pressure not only acts on adults, but on the full life history of the insect. Here we focus attention on Rhinusa antirrhini (Curculionidae), a species of weevil broadly distributed across Europe that both feeds on, and oviposits and develops within, species of the plant genus Linaria (Plantaginaceae). Using a combination of mtDNA (COII) and nuclear DNA (EF1-alpha) sequencing and copulation experiments we assess evidence for host associated genetic differentiation within R. antirrhini. We find substantial genetic variation within this species that is best explained by ecological specialisation on different host plant taxa. This genetic differentiation is most pronounced in the mtDNA marker, with patterns of genetic variation at the nuclear marker suggesting incomplete lineage sorting and/or gene flow between different host plant forms of R. antirrhini, whose origin is estimated to date to the mid-Pliocene (3.77 Mya; 2.91-4.80 Mya).",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken",
journal = "Molecular Ecology",
title = "Host-associated genetic differentiation in a seed parasitic weevil Rhinusa antirrhini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data",
pages = "2300-2286",
number = "11",
volume = "19",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04639.x"
}
Hernandez-Vera, G., Mitrović, M., Jović, J., Toševski, I., Caldara, R., Gassmann, A.,& Emerson, B. C.. (2010). Host-associated genetic differentiation in a seed parasitic weevil Rhinusa antirrhini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data. in Molecular Ecology
Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken., 19(11), 2286-2300.
https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04639.x
Hernandez-Vera G, Mitrović M, Jović J, Toševski I, Caldara R, Gassmann A, Emerson BC. Host-associated genetic differentiation in a seed parasitic weevil Rhinusa antirrhini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data. in Molecular Ecology. 2010;19(11):2286-2300.
doi:10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04639.x .
Hernandez-Vera, Gerardo, Mitrović, Milana, Jović, Jelena, Toševski, Ivo, Caldara, Roberto, Gassmann, Andre, Emerson, Brent C., "Host-associated genetic differentiation in a seed parasitic weevil Rhinusa antirrhini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data" in Molecular Ecology, 19, no. 11 (2010):2286-2300,
https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04639.x . .
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