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dc.creatorMitrović, Milana
dc.creatorPetrović, Anđeljko
dc.creatorKavallieratos, Nickolas G.
dc.creatorStary, Petr
dc.creatorPetrović-Obradović, Olivera
dc.creatorTomanović, Željko
dc.creatorVorburger, Christoph
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-04T15:59:24Z
dc.date.available2019-04-04T15:59:24Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn1049-9644
dc.identifier.urihttp://plantarum.izbis.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/297
dc.description.abstractLysiphlebus testaceipes (Cress.) is an aphidiine parasitoid originally introduced to Europe as a biological control agent of citrus aphids in the Mediterranean. It has rapidly become widespread in coastal areas continuing gradually to expand inland. L. testaceipes exploited a large number of aphids in Europe, including new hosts and significantly changed the relative abundance of the native parasitoids. This behavior may reflect a broad oligophagy of the introduced parasitoid or it may require the evolution of host specialization that results in genetically differentiated subpopulations on different hosts. To address this issue we used the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I and seven microsatellite loci to analyze the structure of genetic variation for L. testaceipes samples collected from 12 different aphid hosts across seven European countries, as well as some samples from Benin, Costa Rica, USA, Algeria and Libya for comparison. Only five COI haplotypes with moderate divergence were identified overall. There was no evidence for the association of haplotypes with different aphid hosts in the European samples, but there was geographic structuring in this variation. Haplotype diversity was highest in France, where L. testaceipes was introduced, but only a single haplotype was detected in areas of south-eastern Europe that were invaded subsequently. The analysis of microsatellite variation confirmed the lack of host-associated genetic structure, as well as differentiation between populations from south-western and southeastern Europe. The parasitoid L. testaceipes in Europe is thus an opportunistic oligophagous species with a population structure shaped by the processes of introduction and expansion rather than by host exploitation. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en
dc.publisherAcademic Press Inc Elsevier Science, San Diego
dc.relationSCOPES program of the Swiss National Science Foundation - IZ73Z0_128174
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MESTD/Integrated and Interdisciplinary Research (IIR or III)/43001/RS//
dc.relationAcademy of Sciences of the Czech Republic - AV0Z50070508
dc.rightsrestrictedAccess
dc.sourceBiological Control
dc.subjectLysiphlebus testaceipesen
dc.subjectMicrosatelliteen
dc.subjectCytochrome oxidase Ien
dc.subjectBiological controlen
dc.subjectParasitoidsen
dc.titleGeographic structure with no evidence for host-associated lineages in European populations of Lysiphlebus testaceipes, an introduced biological control agenten
dc.typearticle
dc.rights.licenseARR
dc.citation.epage158
dc.citation.issue3
dc.citation.other66(3): 150-158
dc.citation.rankM21
dc.citation.spage150
dc.citation.volume66
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biocontrol.2013.05.007
dc.identifier.rcubconv_855
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-84879578047
dc.identifier.wos000321826600002


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