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dc.creatorToševski, Ivo
dc.creatorCaldara, Roberto
dc.creatorJović, Jelena
dc.creatorHernandez-Vera, Gerardo
dc.creatorBaviera, Cosimo
dc.creatorGassmann, Andre
dc.creatorEmerson, Brent C.
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-04T16:02:26Z
dc.date.available2019-04-04T16:02:26Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0307-6970
dc.identifier.urihttps://plantarum.izbis.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/395
dc.description.abstractA combined taxonomic, morphological, molecular and biological study revealed that stem-galling weevils from the genus Rhinusa associated with toadflaxes from the genus Linaria (Plantaginaceae) are composed of three different species: Rhinusa pilosa, Rhinusa brondelii and Rhinusa rarasp.n. The authentic field host plants are respectively, Linaria vulgaris, Linaria purpurea and Linaria genistifolia/ Linaria dalmatica. These weevil species can be distinguished from each other by a few subtle morphological characteristics, mainly in the shape of the rostrum and of the integument. An analysis of the mitochondrial [cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene (COII) and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S)] and nuclear (elongation factor-1, EF-1) sequence data revealed high genetic divergence among these species. Uncorrected pairwise distances on mtCOII gene were 14.3% between R. pilosa and R. brondelii, 15.7% between R. pilosa and R. rara, while R. brondelii and R. rara were approximately 11% divergent from each other. Divergences obtained on 16S and nuclear EF-1 genes were congruent. However, substantial intraspecific mitochondrial divergence was recorded for all studied populations of R. pilosa s.s. showing two mtDNA lineages, with estimated COII and 16S divergences of 4% and 1.6%, respectively. Nuclear pseudogenes (Numts) and Wolbachia influence, although recorded within both lineages, were excluded as possible causatives of the mtDNA divergence, while EF-1 indicated absence of lineage sorting. Species from the R. pilosa complex are estimated to have diverged from each other approximately 7.2 million years ago (mya; late Miocene), while R. brondelii and R. rara diverged from each other about 4.7 mya (early Pliocene). This published work has been registered in ZooBank, .en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell, Hoboken
dc.relationWyoming Biological Control Steering Committee
dc.relationMinistry of Forests and Range
dc.relationBritish Columbia Provincial Government
dc.relationUSDA-APHIS-CPHST
dc.relationUSDA Forest Service through the Montana State University
dc.relationCalifornia Department of Food and Agriculture
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MESTD/Integrated and Interdisciplinary Research (IIR or III)/43001/RS//
dc.rightsrestrictedAccess
dc.sourceSystematic Entomology
dc.titleHost-associated genetic divergence and taxonomy in the Rhinusa pilosa Gyllenhal species complex: an integrative approachen
dc.typearticle
dc.rights.licenseARR
dc.citation.epage287
dc.citation.issue1
dc.citation.other40(1): 268-287
dc.citation.rankaM21
dc.citation.spage268
dc.citation.volume40
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/syen.12109
dc.identifier.rcubconv_896
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-84920618643
dc.identifier.wos000347453400016


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